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. risks will come down. but we're still in an environment where you need to focus on the risks out there. >> i don't think that's anytime soon. >> and that will be very important. >> i think investors need to focus on that down the road. for now, it's not going to be a factor pore probably most of the year, we would think. >> and i guess a little surprising is the economy feels like it's starting to turn. if you look at housing, if you look at what we hear from a lot of ceos about what's happening at this very moment, they feel okay with that. it's just when you ask them to give you guidance for the next quarter or the next year, they say they can't see that far. >> and i think it comes down to having things like the ee quester. certainly a reconciliation after the fact that the u.s. is spending so much more than it brings in. i think one of the interesting things, just around rates, bullard yesterday, for example, said that he expects 3% real growth this year. so 3% real growth and 2% inflation, that gets me to march like a 5% ten-year. we're nowhere close to that. lloyd blankfein was o
in the future saying this is a low growth environment. the new norm. as a result, they are all competing for the same market share, which typically, leads to pricing pressure. there's not a bigger pie growing. it's, rather, how do we slice up the pie today. >> spreeing to hear in light of the fact that the stock market is back to historic highs, but that's driven by profits of companies saying they may not have the leverage any longer. interesting to see they feel slower growth in the brick countries, but hope coming from beyond that. >> yeah, uh-huh. this year, the brick countries historically slowed down a little. you have optimism from china in the last six months, but they are moving into the next generation being a malaysia, indonesia, africa, turkey, and the like. corporates focus on that rise in consumer for opportunities to diversify the revenue stream and go after the growth. >> fascinating. look at the consumer at home and what's going on here and holding back, they are worried about the impact of higher taxes on the consumer. 77% of the american population saw the paycheck shr
. the president left washington today for the comparatively grownup environment of a room full of 4-year-olds. it went well. that's coming up. i was in the ambulance and i was told to call my next of kin. at 33 years old, i was having a heart attack. now i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i didn't know this could happen so young. take control, talk to your doctor. prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonder what other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] did you just turn your ringer off so no one would interrupt and.us?one. oh no, i... just used my geico app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. all stations come over to mithis is for real this ti
washington today for the comparatively grownup environment of a room full of 4-year-olds. went well. hold on. that's coming up. wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new transmission. [ coyote howls ] how about no more surprises? now you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it
in this constrained budget environment. we must help ensure dhs become a better stewart of tax dollars. recommendations by today's witnesses will help us better understand the issues that dhs faces and identify ways to help dhs improve. i look forward to their testimony. the chairman bomb that recognize the ranking member of the subcommittee, for any statement he may have. >> thank you mr. chairman. it is a pleasure to be here. i welcome witnesses and members of the subcommittee. i am looking for to working with the chairman and a bipartisan and productive manner as we conduct oversight in the department of homeland's security and other security functions. it is apparent, having met with the chairman at length, that we see eye to eye on many issues related to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. i appreciate his collaboration as we move this important agenda for tweets this is our first subcommittee meeting at cannot think of a better issue to examine. the department of, security has one of the largest budget in the federal government. each year brings in $40 million in
of the commitment to our students of the social character development skills and save positive learning environment that fosters their success. each of us is here today because we are seeking answers. answers about how to address one of the largest impediment to achieving this goal. bullying. i would like to present you just a few steps, if that is okay. nearly half of middle school principals who participated in a national bullying survey indicated that this issue ranked as one of the top five challenges in their school. we are indeed making progress into dispelling the myth that bullying is merely a rite of passage. currently, 49 states have implemented anti-bullying politics. according to the national bullying survey, only one in six principals report that the number of bullying incidents has decreased significantly as a result of their bullying initiatives. despite our best efforts bullying continues to plague our students and we can have it in our schools. as educators and participants in today's summit, we are well aware that providing the skills and tools that promote safety and well-being a
, a political environment that could, in fact, i in danger and threaten the civil freedoms of the united states, if all of a sudden the american people demand a response that congress feels it must respond and civil liberties could be the first thing that goes overboard. you mentioned the national defense authorization act. i think it's a very legitimate concern. one of the principal focu focusf our advisory panel, principle focuses was whether or not and how you use the military in the homeland. if you create a panic or a stress environment in the united states, there is a danger that the executive branch will simply respond and use whatever resources are available to it without regard to law or restrictions such as -- which, of course, we know a doctrine that prohibits the use of military and homeland. it was one of the five principal focuses of our advisory panel, our concern over this type of environment. the ndaa, the national defense authorization act in fact in our view does begin to move the military into a domestic responsibility and into a domestic function. this is not good. and that
in volume is really a natural occurrence in this environment. > you are just back from china. what did you find there? > > lots of pollution. i was in beijing for two days. i have been in china numerous times, and this was by far the worst i've ever seen it. but, aside from that, you look at the economy, things are moving. it is bouncing right along, and they are rebalancing the economy. you can see the service sector, the financial sector, different things moving. so i think in general things are moving in china. there is still a lot to be done and a lot of reform to be done, not the least of which is clean air and clean water. but i think these are things, initiatives to look forward to, and other than that, i think china is moving as expected, if not better. > we will take out our pollution put there tim. and what about the united states? what worries you about the market here? > > you know, not a lot worries me right now in this market. it is liquidity-driven. the fed is buying 80% of the treasury, which is unbelievable. i never thought i'd see that. so i think as long as that occurs,
this great nation. our soldiers today operate in a most uncertain and unpredictable environment. it is the most dynamic and unpredictable i have seen in my over 36 years of service. unlike post-conflict drawdowns, where we have a termination of conflict due to a police treaty or a political decline of a -- peavece trearty or a political decline of a superpower, instead today we have 81,000 soldiers deployed, including 50,000 fighting in afghanistan, and thousands of others in kuwait, in the horn of africa. over 91,000 soldiers are stationed in over 160 countries. we have been in a continuous state of war in the last 12 years, the longest in our history. but today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the fiscal uncertainty resulting from a lack of predictability in the budget cycle, a series of continuing resolutions, a threat of sequestration hanging over our heads, our country's inability to put its fiscal house in order compromise is the full readiness of the joint force, army, and will impact our ability to provide our security to our nation. we hav
and the environment and touched on in the inaugural address and starting wednesday the president will hit the road, takes the message to residents of north carolina, georgia and north carolina. our next guest was a speechwriter for president clinton. including four state of the union addresses. michael waldman is executive director of the brennan center for justice at nyu. welcome. >> great to be with you. >> what's the strategy behind a more aggressive maybe antagonist kind of message that we might hear tomorrow night? >> well, one of the things is that it seems to be working. i think that his inaugural address, for example, was to me the best speech he's given as president. it didn't have some of the drabness and caution of some of his earlier speeches. it said something. and so, i think that if he keeps going with that approach of boldness and ambition it is not that everything he says is enacted in to law but he'll be able to make a case to the country and with some vivid colors and strong arguments. >> and the country wants to hear a lot about jobs which was relatively unmentioned in the inau
. the technology behind the battery for the chevy volt was developed here. >> it is a global environment. sodalities in the u.s. can be made available to countries like india and bangladesh almost immediately. >> the goal is to extend battery life to 10 or 15 years within this decade. because the battery is the engine of the electric car and a big part of the cost, that would cut prices and pollution levels around the world. alice everett, illinois. al jazeera reporting from illinois. >> u.s. country music star mindy mccready was found dead from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound. in recent years if she received attention for a troubled family life after getting a string of hits in the 1990's. 300,000 children working illegally in mexico in the fields that provide produced for dinner tables across the globe. we traveled to the western state to find out what authorities are doing to stop child exploitation. for this 3-ong day year-old come up at dawn and working until dusk, taking chili peppers -- picking chili peppers. it'
for the government to tell business you will pay that guy that amount of money. >> i think it is in this environment we need some change and people, again, if you had to look at the bigger picture which i think that everybody is looking at microscopic approaches to thing. we have an economy that's suffering, a deficit. an entitlement program that's in big trouble and getting people off of poverty you have to pay them more, no one is making $9, $18,000 a year, how do you expect people to live on 14,000 a year. stuart: don't expect them to live on that, that's what the minimum wage is for, for people fresh out of high school, getting their very, very first job. not for guys in their 40's and 50's. >> and people coming out of high school don't have to worry about getting a first job because with obamacare and-- >> and haven't got a job, they haven't got a job because of this economic policy. i've got to go. nicole, we are on all time high watch for the dow. we open a bit lower and now we're up a bit. >> i'm going to graduate you because you talked and talked and talked until the dow is back in the gree
with the annual state of the union address. on the environment, obama called on lawmakers to take action against global warming with a number of victims of gun violence in attendance, obama also urged congress to vote on new gun control measures, including background checks and bans on massive ammunition magazines. >> congress will not act soon enough to protect future generations. i will. i will direct my cabinet to come up with executive actions we can take now and in the future to reduce pollution, prepare our communities or the consequences of climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy. it has been two months since newtown. i know this is not the first time this country has debated how to reduce them violence, but this time is different. overwhelming majorities of americans, american that believe in the second amendment, have come together around common- sense reform. >> president obama also called on congress to raise the federal wage and toation. in afghanistan, obama announced his plan to end the longest war in u.s. history by withdrawing half of the fo
to learn how uas operate in different environments and how they impact air traffic operations. the test sites also inform the agency as we develop standards for certifying unmanned aircraft and determine the necessary air traffic requirements. in addition to the test sites, faa is publishing a notice in the federal register asking the public to review draft privacy language and provide input. the broad outline of faa's privacy proposal will require each test site to ensure their privacy policies address the following: notice or awareness, choice and consent, access and participation, integrity and security, and, finally, enforcement mechanisms to deal with violations of these policies. the faa thinks the test sites will provide important information that will inform our integration process moving forward. with respect to faa east research and development efforts, we are working in four areas, void, control and communication, maintenance and repair, and human factors. research in all four areas are critical as the opening statements mentioned. my written statement contains more details o
what it is like to be a policy maker trying to do different things in a partisan environment that have come to make the case why the fiscal challenges are so pressing. it is still import we were to come with a comprehensive plan to address them. campaign to fix the debt has been around for not very long but has amassed a tremendous group of support. from citizens across the country where we have 350,000 citizens to have joined the campaign, a present in 50 states, active organizations in 23 states in growing, partnerships with 205,000 small businesses. , and organizations all coming together in a way the country has to to explain why making tough choices of putting in place the policies that were required to get a hold of our nation's fiscal challenges is so important. i am proud to be joined by this tremendous group of former members of congress. i am going to turn it over to one of our three cochairs. do you have senator judd gregg and a few other people representing this new council. thank you very much. >> it is a pleasure to be here was so many of my former colleagues to serve thi
to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in decades. >> because they're locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, the investment, the call for the investment in universal pre-k early education. this is an investment -- >> woodruff: yeah, i wanted to ask you both quickly to respond to that. >> any advanced country understands this is a public investment in our children, our future, and if we want to see upward mobility restored in a country that prides itself, has prided itself on that, this is one step. >> and i think this is one place where, refreshingly, we might see some bipartisan action because i think most republicans i ta
to grow up in an environment like this, in a tough neighborhood, in a tough city. and i think that that is exactly why he's not here right now. i think this conversation is going on longer than anticipated, and the white house really said this was his main focus while he was here at the school was to talk to these young men, martin. >> okay. thank you so much, john yang. let's go back to mark glaze. mark, i just want to make the point for our viewers that john yang was just making, and i want to mention a few reports of deaths attributable to gun violence in the last 24 hours. a man outside dallas was shot and killed early this morning. an arkansas woman was killed in her apartment hour later. and on valentine's day a teenager in north carolina was killed while playing around with a shotgun with her brother. it would be wrong of us just to look at today and think that chicago is unique in some way. this is a nationwide problem, isn't it? >> and the point that our mayors make all of the time is that the public pays a lot of attention when there's a mass shooting because it's so
the environment. so, the green button here we are in san francisco, i can say with some public comfort that pg&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that's real money if you think about it at a commercial or industrial scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the
to the environment went to three ford vehicles: the f-350 and f-250 truck in their four- wheel drive versions and the e- 350 wagon van. it always pays to get behind the wheel of a car you want to buy before sitting down to negotate a deal. brian moody of autotrader.com joins us this morning with the insider's look. good to have you here. > > good morning. how are you? > you have named the new volkswagen beetle, dodge dart, cadillac ats, and nissan pathfinder as cars that you think are worth a test drive. what do you suggest for anyone taking a test drive in those cars, or any other car? > > what is important to remember is that if you are buying a car, there is no hurry. take your time. take a long test drive. the salesperson is going to want you to get in and get out quick, because they want to move on with their day and sell more cars. you should spend more time behind the wheel so you feel comfortable. also, what we like to do is bring our families, bring our stuff, our kids, our booster seats, our strollers. make sure all of that fits in the car so that the car fits your lifestyle. that w
are packed to the rim. try giving us a call. we will work even if we can. the environment is great. this is a double anniversary discount. if you have been married for 15 years you get a 30% discount. on christmas special dinner packages as well. if you want to find out about all of their packages, go to their website or we will link you there from our website. wgnh icph [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know that your mouth is under attack, from food particles and bacteria. try fixodent. it helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ ♪ fixodent, and forget it. eant dh we asked what artist received a grammy legend award in 1994? >>the answer frank sinatra and curtis mayfield. >> they are all legends the people you just mentioned. >> we are ok for the next of the week. we may have some flurries later in the week. at actually been a fairly quiet week. with temperatures warming a little bit, you see the big storm that past. as the travels of to the east the wind will continue. we'
10% of recent research involve the environment and prevention. the mental factors include radiation, pesticides, industrial pollutants, consumer products, drugs. a new study finds a gradual decrease in salt and take over a decade would prolong those by increasing heart disease and blood pressure. americans consume 3,600 mg of sodium the day. about 80% of sodium intake comes from so. we're talking about this gn bankers favorite meal. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. romantic valentine's dinner. he is the chef and general manager of the gold coast. this is the way to my heart. today we're going to be doing our famous. i have my butter down in a hot pan. we have some holes sage leaves and ear. at home we can use the cut bacon. just want to chalk that up. i think it has a better taste. that is what gives the c
environment. three at woodstock, 14 at o'hare and 17 in this city right now. they do point of 10 degrees it tonight in chicago. you can see high temperatures today held in the upper 20s it has not been that call for a while. our model forecast keeps it snowing in the seoul snowbelt. you can see the clouds are erupting right there there is the rain comes into our area on monday. it could change briefly to snow. 30 mi. per hour gusts 1:00 p.m. sunday. the one we're watching for late next week is coming here. this thing went off of the japanese coast a couple of days ago. this seems to be pretty accurate we will show you one models take on snow accumulations for that system on friday cautioning and stressing the fact that at this distance it's interesting to see what the models are telling us. 14 tomorrow night's sunshine followed by increasing clouds in the little warmer in the afternoon. you know things are changing. still ahead and wine expert uses his talent to help others in need. the largest social networking site to become the victim of packers. a febreze experiment. to prove
with families, to life to changes in one's and environment, and to deal with adversity. just think about that. being productive, developing positive relationships with others, adapting to change, like adolescents, for example, dealing with adversity. we saw 30% rate of depression in new orleans after hurricane katrina. so mental health is being able to deal with these life challenges and circumstances and to be productive. it should follow then that mental disorder, mental illness represents alterations in those mental functions such that one is able to carry them out because the mood disorders, thinking disorders, were behavioral disorders. so mental disorders follow immediately from the definition of mental health. i do not want you to take your mental health for granted, because that is what we do. we take our known health for granted, and so therefore, we are not sympathetic when people have mental illnesses, because we have not thought about the fact we could lose it. we do not want to take our mental health for granted. there were five key messages in the surgeon general's report that c
ott, tom created an environment built around using serious and objective and economical analysis to inform that indications policymaking functions at a critical time in american history took place. a junction where we would continue the communications and embrace our more traditional reliance on open entry in the competitive free enterprise system. at that important juncture, it was a division that lend themselves to technical and economic analyses, if you will. in the case of open skies, there were enough parking spaces to accommodate competitive entry also. they were not enough parking spot, but likewise committee argued that the propelling economies or scale for natural monopoly characteristics associated with the network and it would make competitive entry inefficient or unwise from a public policy perspective. a similar question and other crucial areas, such as the innovations market and the satellite mobile radio field, as i would look around the audience, i see so many people that were involved and played key roles in these studies and these issues. the contribution was no
significantly, down 7.3%, at $13.16 a share. talking about their environment, obviously, there's a tough environment trying to sell old-school books and compete with amazon. you talk e-readers, and that's putting them under pressure today and the nook. talk about the nook and outlook, they talk about a loss for 2013, more than expected, more than of a loss than they thought, and as a result, the stock is tanking. back to you. >> thank you very much, nicole. leapfrog jumping ahead. profit up 90% year over year, and sales rising 16% in the fourth quarter could be a 28% pop in full year revenue. john bash -- john barber, the ceo, you had earnings, down 20% in six months. what's wrong with the picture? >> well, it's actually 70% in 12 months -- >> you joined the company, i believe? >> two years ago. we had four of the top ten selling products last year. i'm a holder of leap frog and excited. i believe the market will have the opportunity in the near future. >> the company came up with the first leap pad, in i think, 1999 or so, surprised they didn't have the ipad, coasted on your coat tails,
in a deleveraging environment. many of the plans have yet to be put in place. we're definitely making progress. the markets should generally be moving higher but moving to fast to far on a near-term basis can cause some weakness and some pullback on the near-term basis. so we've been very much a advocate of kind of a cautiously constructive of positioning for portfolios for investors as a whole. not hiding in cash and treasurys but not necessarily jumping up and down on every stock we see. ashley: what fits the bill when you're cautiously optimistic and you kind of want to hedge your bets a little bit? >> what this means, we're trying to take selective risks. we're taking risks. we want clients to take risks. it is not hide under the covers and just own cash. but taking selective risks means you're not taking blind equity risk. that means buying some credit risk. high yield bonds. bank loans. international emerging marketing market debt. all these of those are attractive opportunities right now on a long-term basis. within equities, find your protection there. actually be more defensive in equ
well trying to push into the environment of much more thoughtful progressive policies about these issues the. >> they have lots of money, though. so those are very successful companies. and you could argue because your doing some of the things you're augusting. >> no question. >> take me to a company that's struggling been take me to a company that can't afford to give out free food throughout the day and free massages throughout the day. >> they're not going to let people sleep for two hours in a room somewhere, are they? >> no. but this is make missing the point. until you make this intellectual shift, more hours means more productivity. even one less hour of sleep gives us one more hour to be productive. that's nonsense. what it gives us is one more hour to by be partially productive because you're tired. >> do you think europe is productive? >> they rest a lot over there. >> you've got naps after lunch, you work a slightly longer day, but it's -- >> it's overdetermined. there are too many factors going on for me to answer that question and the german economy is very diff
is different than the environment started 100 years ago but the editorial focus is to challenge our readers assumptions. from one perspective why wouldn't all media do that? and i think particularly in 2013 in the environment where it does not. on the women of the spectrum when i call the newspapers used to be the dominant news delivery method. it's now "the new york times" also the huffingtonpost.com, the daily beast. it gives you information about what happened jester date. it tends to be hit line driven cut it tends to be what you read at 9 a.m.. it's part of my media every day and part of everyone's media digest. on the other end of the spectrum it is a starkly -- historic the their fan magazines and it's been largely about storytelling wedding of things like "the new york times" magazine or the new yorker or other relief venerable new yorker books, other really venerable publications which take time to read and context and it pretty educated audience. for us we are trying to position ourselves in the space in between the two. the goal at the new republic is to do great writing, the typ
, these are difficult environments as opposed to houston where you can do whatever you want, whenever you want to. >> right. >> so i think that the rental housing market i think is going to continue to be very strong. like it was too good and then everybody had to come up with a reason why it wasn't. >> is the home mortgage deduction going to come back on the table? does that have anything to do with the rental issue you're talking about? >> i actually think home mortgage deductions are going to come back on the table. i think they're going to ultimately either be eliminated as they were in canada, and when they were eliminated in canada, everybody said, oh, my god, it's the end of the housing market, and it was hardly a blip. or it will be cut to deductions on the first $100,000 or something, so you're effectively protecting the middle class. >> thank you for this. >> yeah, sam, it has been a pleasure having you here today. >> my pleasure. >> we really appreciate hearing from you. sam zell has been our guest host for the last two hours. you're putting your money where your mouth is. it's all abo
environment. it doesn't determine that you're going to be a failure. the gun violence, regardless of how many laws are passed, it's up to the people to unite to build stronger bridges of communication, to make a difference in the commy.
and raped the indians and took all the land. destroyed the environment. but now they are saying that pilgrims are illegal aliens. sure you're sure the -- >> bob: you're sure the whole left is like that? this is what greg does. andrea is guilty of this, too. it's certain people do that. that is a good idea? no, i do not. west of taxpayer money. do i think that the people who came in to force indians off their land and murdered them? >> were you coming over on the may flouer? >> my family came over in chains as enemy of the state. >> dana: then they were part of apartheid or something like that. listen to one more sound bite from this. >> together we make extension of each other's quest. to work for all of us. so thank you, black folks. say thank you, black folks. say america was founded by outsiders. say that. or today insiders. >> dana: i think if i had been an employee and required to go to this, i don't think i would have said any of. that i wouldn't want to go. because i had more important things to do. >> eric: you have to watch it and wonder if he was being outrageous to pr
environments for young people and their families where they feel comfortable asking for help. i am counting on america's doctors to help lead his conversations. the care you provide for your patience will always be your first job. today, there are many other ways for doctors to make a difference in peoples lives lives. starting with contributing to the transformation of our health care system. we have made great progress in the last few years. i look forward to working on that progress and creating a health system that patients vomit doctors, and this country deserve. thank you all for what you do every day. [applause]>> today, rhode island senator sheldon whitehouse, author and former white house advisor, and representatives from the sierra club will be among the speakers at the forward on climate rally. coverage beginning at noon eastern here on c-span. >> i think the women themselves in many cases, were interested in politics but had no vehicle to express that in their own lives. they were attracted to men who were going to become politically active or were already politically after if -
was a traditional medicine woman of my people. i learned early on the value of our environment. she was known as dr. sophie t homas and her words are still with me today. and what she told us was when we take care of the land, the land would take care of us. [applause] if we destroy this land, we will destroy ourselves. i am speaking on behalf of the alliance from northern british columbia. it translates to people of the earth. i am part of those people from the northern regions of the northwest territories, down to my cousin's, a navajo of arizona. we formed an alliance to stop the enbridge it will project that plans to bring tar sands will been to the coast of british columbia, which will then be put on tankers to go to the asian markets. the alliance is supposed to irresponsible environmental damaging projects that puts our communities, our water, our culture, our land, our fish, our animals, and most importantly, our plants, at risk free it it puts at risk my neighbors to the east of me that live in the tar sands. the government does not recognize these people. and these people have been dying
and took all the land. destroyed the environment. but now they are saying that pilgrims are illegal aliens. sure you're sure the -- >> bob: you're sure the whole left is like that? this is what greg does. andrea is guilty of this, too. it's certain people do that. that is a good idea? no, i do not. west of taxpayer money. do i think that the people who came in to force indians off their land and murdered them? >> were you coming over on the may flouer? >> my family came over in chains as enemy of the state. >> dana: then they were part of apartheid or something like that. listen to one more sound bite from this. >> together we make extension of each other's quest. to work for all of us. so thank you, black folks. say thank you, black folks. say america was founded by outsiders. say that. or today insiders. >> dana: i think if i had been an employee and required to go to this, i don't think i would have said any of. that i wouldn't want to go. because i had more important things to do. >> eric: you have to watch it and wonder if he was being outrageous to prove a point, opposite point. like
in the environment. essentially, the blind can see something, again. >> one of the things i can do now is laundry. my husband had to put the colored clothes together in a pile and with the glasses i can do that myself. >> reporter: cathy blake is 61. and has been blind for 23 years, but after a two-hour search, she has a new perspective. >> the glasses really help me be more outdoors with mobility, walking. >> reporter: right now the device is only approved for retinitis pigmentosa. a rare genetic disease that causes complete vision loss. only 100,000 people in the u.s. suffer from it. the hope is the device can be used to treat millions who can't see. >> i really think the future for this is going to be big. >> that really is incredible. and it did not come cheap at all, $100 million in public money and $100 million in private money to get to that technology. >> two clinical trials, 20 years of trying this. and this is the kind of story you always hear about some kind of development to help people who don't have an arm or leg, but sight is one of the most precious things that we have. to be able to
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